Spotlight On: Carnation Flowers

Also known as Dianthus, carnations come in many different colours, each with its meaning. Carnations can grow up to 80cm in total with leaves growing up to 15cm in length. One carnation can have around five flowers, each producing a lovely scent and with three to five centimetres of diameter.

Stunningly colourful and aromatic, these flowers will adorn commercial buildings beautifully.

 

Facts and History

Native to Mediterranean and European areas, carnations have historically been used for the first time in garlands by the Romans and the Greeks in ancient times. The name derives from the Greek words “dios”, signifying the God Zeus, and “Anthos”, meaning flower. Dianthus means ‘Flower of God”, but its modern name ‘carnation’ is believed to derive from Latin, with “carnis” meaning flesh.

With approximately 300 species of carnations in the world, the different colours have been attributed meaning throughout the years. Their colour, however, can be changed by adding dye to the water.

 

Meanings of Carnations

The flower itself signifies fascination and a woman’s love; light red carnations mean admiration and dark red carnations mean deep love. Pink carnations represent a mother’s love and purple carnations mean capriciousness. White carnations mean good luck and pure love, while striped carnations mean regret and refusal. Yellow carnations represent disappointment and dejection, and green carnations are seen as the representation of St Patrick’s Day. A blue carnation is common at weddings, as it represents truth and peace.

 

Health Benefits

With a long lasting bloom, even after being cut, this flower has become popular for vases but also for its properties. Carnations can be made into oil, which helps to promote relaxation. This massage oil is believed to help with skin regeneration, providing an added softness to the skin.

In addition, carnations have been used in tea making for centuries. In ancient China, this delicious tea was used to promote vitality and relax the spirit. In more modern times, the tea has been used to treat tense muscles.

Ancient Aztecs used carnations in brews, making homeopathic medicines. Chest congestion and other illnesses were treated with varying quantities of the flower and sugar, letting it boil for hours for effect. Other uses and treatments include stress stomach aches, sea sickness, facial wrinkles, and rosacea.

Ideal for any event, carnations are perfect for restaurants as a colourful addition. Get in touch with our friendly team by giving us a call on 0208 968 8190; we’re always happy to help and answer any query you might have!